Lifting the Lid on the Royal Household

AS far as job titles go, those of the British Royal Household have a touch of the Ronseal –  they do exactly what they say on the tin. If you are in doubt  get a load of these occupations…Necessary Woman To The Corridor And Entrance Hall; Yeoman Of The Mouth To Her Majesty Queen Mary In The Pantry; Chocolate Maker To The Queen; Strewer Of Herbs And Laundress Of The Body Linen, and Keeper Of The Lions In The Tower.
No chance of confusion there, then…
   You can now marvel at royal life below stairs with a new online resource. The Royal Household Staff Lists are being made available for the first time on the website findmypast.co.uk.
   It’s all part of clebrating the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee and is being done in association with the Royal Archives.
The rarely-viewed documents include 50,000 staff records from 1660 and 1924, covering reigns ranging from King Charles II to King George V.
   They could prove to be a goldmine for writers of historical fiction as it paints a detailed picture of life in the Royal Court and offers details  of staff names, occupation, age, length of service and salary. Researchers can now get a tantalising look at the roles of pages, craftsmen, chaplains, physicians, musicians, watermen and Yeomen of the Guard.

http://www.findmypast.co.uk/content/news/royal-archives

Advertisements

About historywithatwist

I am an Associate Editor with a national newspaper. I have a keen interest in history and in writing. I have published one novel, Tan, and am currently working on a sequel
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s