Sinking Into Oblivion

The SS Arabic sinking (Image: Photo: Illustrated London News [London, England]

The SS Arabic sinking (Image: Illustrated London News [London, England]

The captain was on the bridge of the ship when he saw the track of the torpedo about 300 ft away, but by then it was too late.

Captain William Finch was a portly man, but I imagine him moving faster than someone of his build would be expected. I can almost see those jowls quiver as he issued his final commands before the torpedo struck, sending a huge column of water into the air and hurling him into the sea.

Finch was sucked beneath the roiling waves, but he fought for his life and managed to make his way to the surface.

SS Arabic

SS Arabic

It was August 19, 1915, and his passenger ship, the SS Arabic, was in its death throes, having been torpedoed without warning by German submarine U-24 just four miles off Ireland’s Cape Clear.

There were 180 passengers – 145 British, 26 Americans and several Spanish, French, Belgians and Russians on board, as well as 250 crew, travelling from Liverpool to New York.

Fourteen lifeboats were launched, and all the passengers donned the life jackets that had been placed around the ship’s deck. Finch and his men must have worked very fast because in little over 10 minutes the SS Arabic would be gone, taking 44 lives with her.

Captain WIliam Finch (Image: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA)

Captain William Finch
(Image: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA)

Had it not been for the quick actions of captain and crew, the number of fatalities would have been higher. As William Finch said later about the engineers, who stuck to their posts up to the last moment: ‘They were heroes a thousand times over, who carried out my orders from the bridge, even when they knew the ship was sinking.

‘It was well that this was so, as otherwise the loss of life would have been very large, as the enemy submarine never gave us any warning whatever, and as a matter of fact we never saw her.’

A little over two months earlier, on June 9, the luxury liner RMS Lusitania was struck by a torpedo just a few miles from the Arabiic’s position. It sank with the loss of almost 1200 lives.

On October 10, 1918, the RMS Leinster would suffer the same fate. A German submarine sank it as it travelled across the Irish Sea to Holyhead. A total of 529 civilian and military passengers were killed that day – the greatest ever loss of life in that stretch of water and the greatest loss of life on an Irish-registered ship.

I’d never heard of the Leinster, much less the Arabic. It is ships like the Lusitania and the Titanic that we commemorate. The loss of life was greater in those tragedies, and in the numbers’ game that sometimes is history, they qualify as somehow being more significant.

Tell that to the families of those on the Arabic, who felt the weight of their loss almost a hundred years ago to this day.

History can be as unforgiving as the cruel sea. It takes complex, nuanced lives that were filled with passions, secrets, loves and fears, and then consigns them to its dusty depths, leaving only a statistic to be browsed by the mildly curious.

I’ll think of the Arabic in the days ahead. That’s not much as far as commemorations go, but it’s all that’s left.

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About historywithatwist

I am an Associate Editor with a national newspaper. I have a keen interest in history and in writing. I have published one novel, Tan, and am currently working on a sequel
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10 Responses to Sinking Into Oblivion

  1. roberthorvat says:

    A horrible loss. It is a shame I have not heard of this story before. Thank you David for bringing it to my attention.

  2. How tragic. I, too, was unaware of the disasters which befell the Arabic and the Leinster. Well done for bringing these facts to light.

    My Belfast-born grandfather was in the RN and was at the Battle of Jutland and witnessed the Germans turning their guns on drowning Allied sailors. As for their conduct in WW2, the recently disclosed transcripts of covertly recorded conversations between German POWs confirmed that those German naval crews were aware that it was passenger ships they were destroying, especially in the case of the City of Benares, which they knew carried 90 children evacuees, 77 of whom were killed when they torpedoed that ship.

  3. Writing about these people and events as you do, David, honors their lives. Thanks for doing this.

  4. Thanks Carol, very nice of you to say.

  5. I didn’t know about the Arabic and the Leinster thanks for enlightening us, those tragedies should never be forgotten.

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